Your turf, or mine?

I love the description of the rebuilding of the wall in Jerusalem under Nehemiah’s close eye.  We read phrases like “next to him”, and “beside him” throughout the narrative as each family group takes responsibility for a part of the reconstruction.

Obviously, Nehemiah couldn’t accomplish the project on his own; it may have been his vision, but the people’s participation was not only expected, but necessary.  There’s a lesson for the church right there—pastors can’t do it all; in fact, not even most of the work in building God’s kingdom. Continue reading “Your turf, or mine?”

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Red Ink

neuschwanstein-castle-467116_1280Red ink.  The bane of literary students, or any student for that matter.  You know what it means: misstake, eRr0r, wrong answer, ruuunnnn-on sentence (that was one of my specialties, still is, for all that.)  My husband is a teacher, and with some of his exams he allows what I call a do-over (he calls it a “revision”, which sounds much more professorial.) The red ink, or whatever he uses, shows the mistakes which, as disappointing and uncomfortable as it may be at the time, is actually a good thing.  The student then gets another chance.

This is what happened with the people in Nehemiah’s day.  Having returned from their seventy-year exile to their home in Jerusalem, they were now being instructed from God’s book of the Law, some of them undoubtedly for the first time.  Their collective reaction is quite compelling: Continue reading “Red Ink”

Hand me the drill, please

neuschwanstein-castle-467116_1280My tool box is not extensive.  And over the years I have at least had the limited wisdom and resources to gather in a few more specimens to adorn my garage walls: an electric sander, an electric drill, an electric saw; good grief!  Makes me appreciate our forebears prior to Ben Franklin’s little kite and key experiment.  Some things I have procured only AFTER trying to accomplish the job using,…something else.

Failing to use the correct tool for the job can be not only inconvenient, but downright dangerous.  A Phillips screwdriver does a lot better on a Phillips-head screw than, say, a table knife.  Ask me how I know.  I could give Continue reading “Hand me the drill, please”