Where’s a screen writer when you need one?

Have you noticed that it seems like quite a few flicks coming out of southern Cal studios are based on true events?  Maybe the “Industry” kingpins (holding the purse strings) have realized that it’s profitable for art to imitate life rather than the other way around.

Clearly, there’s enough drama, intrigue, and corresponding courage in life and history to keep the screen writers busy.  Here’s one I haven’t seen written yet.

It’s the story of a gutsy, everyday guy named Nehemiah, an exile with all the Jewish people in a pagan nation, who somehow lands a job in the palace serving at the king’s table every day.  According to an old prophecy, however, it’s now time for the Jewish people to return to their own land; in fact, the (second) exodus out of this foreign territory has already begun. 

Nehemiah sees a serious need and thinks he’s the man for the job.  The critically important point here, however, is his prior preparation, (which, I’m afraid, might be glossed over in a Hollywood screenplay…), mentioned in yesterday’s post. With his prayers still ringing the halls of Heaven, and his very detailed plan in his hip pocket, he goes to work like any other day.  When God opens the door, he unhesitatingly steps across the threshold. 

That brief synopsis brings us up to this point: after the king grants Nehemiah’s first request (an extended leave of absence), our hero has enough bravado to continue—

I also said to the king, “If it please the king, let me have…”

And they weren’t small requests.  They were huge.  Nehemiah knew what resources the king had at his disposal, more than enough to meet what the plan required.

(Commercial break.)

Which reminds me of something in the New Testament—

So let us come boldly to the throne of our gracious God. There we will receive his mercy, and we will find grace to help us when we need it most.

Now back to our Old Testament screenplay.

When Nehemiah sets out on his adventure, which it certainly was, we find a little parenthetical comment tucked among his notes:

When I came to the governors of the province west of the Euphrates River, I delivered the king’s letters to them. The king, I should add, had sent along army officers and horsemen to protect me.

Interestingly, that armed guard is not listed with Nehemiah’s other requests.

(And now for another word from our Sponsor…)

Now all glory to God, who is able, through his mighty power at work within us, to accomplish infinitely more than we might ask or think.

old-1130743_1920The incredible story of Nehemiah continues, albeit not without some serious plot twists and reversals of fortune enough to keep any script writer or special effects crew busy.  

Sounds like real life to me.  (Anybody gotta pen??)

Nehemiah 2:7,9; Hebrews 4:16; Ephesians 3:20  Holy Bible, New Living Translation, copyright © 1996, 2004, 2015 by Tyndale House Foundation. Used by permission of Tyndale House Publishers Inc., Carol Stream, Illinois 60188. All rights reserved.

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Author: dawnlizjones

Tends toward TMI, so here's the short list: guitar and banjo (both of which have been much neglected as of late), bicycling (ibid), dogs, very black tea, and contemplating and commenting on deep philosophical thoughts about which I have had no academic or professional training. Oh, also reading, writing, but I shy away from arithmetic.

8 thoughts on “Where’s a screen writer when you need one?”

  1. I have always wondered what the “Heavenly Kingdom ” drama looked like with Nehemiah. A bit like “This Present Darkness” series I suspect with split second timing”. not to make your job harder writing this.

    Liked by 1 person

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