“Are we there yet?!?”

When people say, “life is a journey”, they’ve obviously never been on family vacations.  Or maybe that’s where the analogy originated!

If you’ve ever traveled with children, (that’s children, plural), you are experienced in a challenge unknown and unappreciated by your adult counterparts.  This was particularly true in the days prior to the techno-burst of unlimited data on tablets to keep the little balls of energy wirelessly entertained while they are strapped for hours in a seatbelt.

Of course they don’t like the seatbelt!  Nevertheless, it’s your responsibility to get them wherever in one piece, despite the potential assault on your own sanity.

   “Jimmy has his elbow in my space!”

   “I’m hungry again!”

   “Beatrice say she has to go to the bathroom!”

   “Nope, never mind, she okay now.”

trip-307920_1280And the ever-popular…

   “ARE WE THERE YET???”

Triple-A should have an app.

So, when the Old Testament priest named Ezra undertook the monumental task of transporting men, women, and children, plus a hoard of silver and gold, back to Jerusalem after the 70-year exile, no wonder he prayed…a lot. Continue reading ““Are we there yet?!?””

Advertisements

The power of obscurity

neuschwanstein-castle-467116_1280I like obscurity.  It’s a safe place, at least for me.  Tucked away on my little plot of Earth in my little small town that barely rates a pin-point on a global map, that’s what I’m talking about.  We had an event one time that brought in some coastal people from back east to our area, and their sentiment was along the lines of, “Where ARE we??”  I am told that people from New York City think of our nation as two coasts, and the in-between is relatively insignificant.  (You know, things like cows and corn and oil, nothing like Fashion Week or Hollywood.) Continue reading “The power of obscurity”

Fit as a Puzzle

neuschwanstein-castle-467116_1280

All right, ladies, ‘fess up.  How many pairs of black shoes (boots included) do YOU have?  Never mind the excuses of why you absolutely needed that third pair of spikes.  The point here is that we like our choices, and when we’re tired of one pair, we can get rid of them (because, see, that’s when I like to buy them, once your shoes hit the second hand stores….okay, there, I ‘fessed up) and easily purchase another.

Unfortunately, that same “unalienable right” of choice—at least, that’s how we tend to see it in the 21st century—plays out in many other facets of our lives, and even more unfortunately, in our church relationships.  We can Continue reading “Fit as a Puzzle”