Reader, Beware

quill

I tend to the side of gullible.  I want to trust too quickly. In this offering, Jacob Emet makes me think and be more circumspect.  Visit him at: https://jacobemet.wordpress.com/  Once again, HERE’s my disclaimer.

READER BEWARE

Beware the names
Beware the faces
Beware the words
Beware the spaces

Beware the lies
That lie between
Apt words scriven
And truth unseen

Beware the allure
Of thoughts evoked
When buds of reason
Thorns have choked

Beware the bride
Without her groom
Her charm is deadly
Her beauty is doom

Beware the beast
In every man
The cunning wolf
Appears a lamb

Beware the light
Behind the eyes
Heart and mind
Aligned knows lies

Beware the perfect
For there is none
Fullness of earth
Unrighteous undone

Beware the truth
All claim to hold
Not all that glitters
Is refined as gold

Beware the words
Beware the spaces
Beware the names
Beware the faces

Reader beware
Reader beware
The names and the faces
Your sins mask to wear

Drip . . . Drip . . . Drip

~ © JacobEmet  used by permission, Visit him at https://jacobemet.wordpress.com/

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Whose #camels are you watering?

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pixabay

The book of Genesis is so fun.  Challenging, but very human.  I recently read the part when Abraham sends his trusted servant bride-hunting back to their home town for the heir to the throne, Isaac.  Camels were the pack animals of the day, and water was a premium, so when he pulled into town, it was important to park at the local well, not only for himself but also for his livestock.

Per custom, the women were coming over to gather water for their needs.  So how was this guy supposed to pick out a bride?  Where does he even start?  Wisely, he started with a prayer.  Smart move.

As one young local approached, he asked her for a drink of the water.  To the servant’s great pleasure, the girl, whose name was Rebekah, not only gave him a refreshing drink, but offered (offered, now, was not asked) to draw water for all of his camels as well.  (!!)

A little research tells us that the water pots these women generally used held about three gallons.  One gallon of water weighs about seven pounds (plus the weight of the heavy pitcher).  One tired and thirsty camel can drink up to 30-gallons.  And since the servant was shopping for a bride for what was effectively a “prince” whose father was exceptionally wealthy, it’s not a far stretch to consider that Abraham had sent his servant with several camels loaded with gifts for the prospective bride’s family, ten to be exact.  You can do the math.  Rebekah’s offer wasn’t just generous; by our standards, it was extravagant.

From one act of unselfish servitude and kindness to unexpected elevation; from watering the camels to riding them as a soon-to-be-princess—we just never know what a little hard work mixed with a good dose of mercy will produce.  Now that’s powerful chemistry!

So, whose camels are you watering?