Not My Poetry

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I R-E-A-L-L-Y want to introduce you to Mitch Teemley’s site.  His sense of humor mixed with his poignant comments (not to mention his writing skill) will keep you coming back again and again.  And then I found that he even writes poetry!!  Okay, enough talent in one package already!

And, BTW, I think this should be our mantra toward all fellow bloggers (just sayin’)…

 

Whether or not, fellow soul,

I should choose to choose you,

I vow to always see you whole

and never ever use you.

Mitch also has an ongoing story line you can follow called

THE WISHING MAP

Elementary, my dear Watson

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Man, I love a good mystery!  A locked-from-the-inside whodunit usually gets my attention; our girls grew up with Nancy Drew and even today Father Brown beckons to me from the teley.  So when I saw that Ian McKellen was casted for an aged Sherlock in the recent flick Mr. Holmes, I was all about that.  It quickly became one of our Friday “pizza and a movie” nights—Bob picked up the flick and I made the pizza.

Both were great!  (Well, the crust was a little too thick, but McCellan was superb…)

I continue to be intrigued how the secular entertainment industry often times, if not unknowingly, leaves the door open for otherwise Judeo-Christian concepts.  Such was my impression of Mr. Holmes.  (If you haven’t seen the movie, feel free to proceed to the next post in your Reader, but I don’t think I have any spoilers.  Of course, I’m not done composing yet, am I?)

Sherlock, now 93, is experiencing a degeneration in his mental acuity, forgetting names, events.  (I’m 57, and that’s normal life for me, but I digress.)  Since his life is built on logic and facts, he naturally turns to science to boost his cranial capacity, as he is desperately trying to recall his last case thirty years hence that was the unfortunate catalyst for his retirement. 

Science is of no help to his failing faculties, but Sherlock is surprised by the healing power of something he never truly valued—relationships.  Loving interaction with friends who are faithful, appreciation of the people around us.  In other words, the master detective realizes (better late than never) that life cannot be reduced to facts and figures (a concept that has been increasingly prevalent in our culture).  We are more than the chemicals in our brains, and we need more than what the religion of science has to offer.

Don’t mistake what I’m saying, please.  Just as a point of reference, my husband has a Ph.D. in molecular, cellular and developmental biology from Indiana University.  My father and brother are M.E’s from Purdue.  We’re all about science stuff.  God created it.

 It’s just that there’s more to life.  Much, much more.

 God puts it this way:

Then the Lord God said, ‘It is not good for the man to be alone. I will make a helper who is just right for him.'”

The God/human community of interaction.  We are fashioned for that.  We need that “something more”.  And even though Sherlock  Holmes doesn’t quite make that complete connection by the end of the movie, he’s definitely moving in the right direction.

Hats off the Hollywood on that one!

 

Genesis 2:18  Holy Bible. New Living Translation copyright© 1996, 2004, 2007, 2013 by Tyndale House Foundation. Used by permission of Tyndale House Publishers Inc., Carol Stream, Illinois 60188. All rights reserved.

Better than d’Artagnan

neuschwanstein-castle-467116_1280I’m not literary, to begin with.  My school-age years were spent during the golden age of this somewhat new-fangled thing called television, and it was easier to watch Ed Sullivan than it was to read a book.  Thankfully, when our oldest child was a tender toddler, I found my way to the local library of the small town that was our current home.  Thus began a love affair with books for my children (and me!) that has never stopped. 

The girls flew the coop years ago, but somehow Bob and I started reading together; that is, he reads to me while I crochet in my rocking chair.  Seriously.  We look like we’re posing for a Norman Rockwell painting.  So the classics I never read are still available (children’s included) and we’re picking them off one by one. 

Case in point: The Three Musketeers.  I don’t know why Dumas called it that, since the there are really four; nonetheless, it was fun, and the author does a good job at developing the unique character of each persona, so we decided to read the sequel.  (I don’t recommend it, unless you’re into literature for the sake of literature.  Me?  I just want to be summarily entertained, which Continue reading “Better than d’Artagnan”

Order in the courtroom, here come ‘da judge

neuschwanstein-castle-467116_1280I love history.  It’s not something I took the time to study in school—my nursing program left little time for things other than, well, bedpans and needles and all things dealing with the human condition…

And yet the study of history deals with the human condition in very real ways as well.  Now, a nurse or doctor will observe certain symptoms in a patient, or review the results of blood work, and thus interpret what is truly happening to plot a course of action.  Interestingly, historians can be similar “diagnosticians” when it comes to, not only digging up the facts of the past, but understanding their context, their significance, and their impact on the present and future. 

In other words, stuff happens, good and bad.  Historians dig out the stuff, and pull out the why, how, and what next.  Without that, we tend to misinterpret the present, making more bad stuff happen for the future.

Case in point: Continue reading “Order in the courtroom, here come ‘da judge”

In other words…

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“Do to others as you would like them to do to you.”

Luke 6: 31  Holy Bible. New Living Translation copyright© 1996, 2004, 2007, 2013 by Tyndale House Foundation. Used by permission of Tyndale House Publishers Inc., Carol Stream, Illinois 60188. All rights reserved.

Roses are red, etc…

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I know, I know.  This is called “Not-My-Poetry”, but I couldn’t resist.  It is, after all, a) my site, and b) traditionally a woman’s prerogative to change her mind.  So I thought I would add my yet-to-be-discovered talent to the mix.  I do, however, maintain my disclaimer HERE.

Proceed at your own risk. (An encomium to some great folks where I work.)

 

To: Our most wonderful middle school custodians!

Have I told you lately how much I appreciate all you do??  (No, probably not, so here it is again–)

ROSES ARE RED

AND CALL ME A KOOK

BUT I’D RATHER DO BLOOD

THAN MOP UP THE PUKE

(wait a minute, that wasn’t very good, let me try again…)

ROSES ARE RED

AND PB IS BROWN

CLEANING MY FLOOR

COULD MAKE ANYONE FROWN

(wait, except for Donna, ‘cuz she’s always smiling.  Once more…)

ROSES ARE RED

AND IVY IS GREEN

YOU ARE THE ONES

WHO KEEP MY ROOM CLEAN!

(So who cares what color roses are anyway!  You guys are super to work with!! Thanks for all you do!  Nurse Dawn, the “non-poet”)Picture1

 

“God is more powerful than my stupid”

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My husband’s brothers and their childhood friends are an interesting lot.  Nice guys, really, but growing up in the 60’s and 70’s, they made their mark, and thankfully were also prevented from doing so a time or two.

One of the (many) stories that has passed into family lore has to do with Bob’s brother and a friend who were caught as they were trying to set fire to some old newspapers in an alley within a neighbor’s garage.  For “some reason” (thank God for guardian angels), the Continue reading ““God is more powerful than my stupid””

Flush, and other Rules for Life

mommyrobin2This photo hot off the press, just in time for Mothers’ Day!  Working in the yard, I found out why a robin was so frequently flying away from my hanging plant when I came home from work.  I discovered this as I took it down to put the ailing flowers in an improved hanger, and VOILA!  Needless to say I was V-E-R-Y careful in getting it fixed and back up to mama. mommyrobin And talk about persistent!  She may get startled and bolt a few yards away, but back she comes every time!  Here she is sitting like a queen on her throne.  (You have to look closely as she is fairly well hidden!)

Persistent.  Now if that’s not the word of the hour for Mothers’ Day.  Or its twin, Relentless.  Who else but mom knows better than anyone that you can’t tell a pre-teen to wash behind his ears once and expect them to keep doing it?  Or the importance of saying please and thank you? (My daughter taught her daughter those words in sign language before the kid could even talk!)  Who else makes you eat your vegetables before your ice cream? (Another one of my daughters hid a carrot stick under her seat…)

Here’s a list one of my middle school students gave to me.  Go figure where she may have learned it:

rules for life

I know that not everyone has had the wonder and heritage of a good mother. Seemingly fewer and fewer, in fact.  I am one of those blessed few, and so I dedicate this post to my mom, who took me on as her own when I was the ripe old age of 13 (along with my brother, who was 15, to add to her own two, who were 14 and 17!!!)  And has stuck by us, lo these 40-plus years.  

Thanks, Mom.  I truly love you.

 

 

I’ve got your back

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I wish I could think of a better title for this, as it was used in a similar offering on Facebook, but it’s honestly the best title for this concept.  A (very) little research reveals that the phrase originated in WW2, when men were cleaning up remaining enemy pockets after a stronghold had been conquered.  Going into a house or room meant his ammo was pointed ahead, but it left the soldier’s back unprotected. 

Unless his comrade “had his back”. 

But sometimes, the comrade isn’t there.  Or is out of Continue reading “I’ve got your back”

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